Jennifer Wilson O'Raghallaigh

Jennifer Wilson O’Raghallaigh is originally from the U.S. and holds a doctorate in clinical psychology from Trinity College, Dublin. She has been employed by the Irish health service for over 20 years, working in mental health with people in distress at different points in the lifespan. She is a respected clinician who is sought after for intervention training and public speaking engagements in corporate and health professional communities.

Mandatory Reporting is a novel that comes from Jenny’s experience of working with children and families in her early training, as well as being a reflection of the day to day decisions she has to make in her clinical practice. Jenny’s experience of humanity at its most vulnerable informs her understanding of both the depths of suffering we experience, and the wellspring of resilience that can help us to heal. Jenny was a finalist in the 2019 Irish Writers Centre Novel Fair and was shortlisted for the 2021 Crime Writers Association Debut Dagger.

Award Type
Mandatory reporting legislation requires clinicians to report suspected abuse, even when there’s uncertainty. For Jonah, a young American engineer-turned-psychology student who has fled to Dublin to escape a tragic past, keeping secrets seems like the only way to save himself.
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Comments

Trevor Wood Tue, 06/22/2021 - 14:30

Great opening line. Not sure whether we're in unreliable narrator territory, could go either way - which is a good thing. The writing's very strong too, especially the dialogue which is both snappy and authentic. Jonah's not entirely likeable - his comments on the physical attributes of every woman he meets could get a little grating - but that's not a bad thing either. I'm only a few thousand words in and I'm enjoying his company, intrigued as to where this is going and whether or not he's on the side of the angels or the devils. It's a very strong start.

Trevor Wood Tue, 06/22/2021 - 14:30

Great opening line. Not sure whether we're in unreliable narrator territory, could go either way - which is a good thing. The writing's very strong too, especially the dialogue which is both snappy and authentic. Jonah's not entirely likeable - his comments on the physical attributes of every woman he meets could get a little grating - but that's not a bad thing either. I'm only a few thousand words in and I'm enjoying his company, intrigued as to where this is going and whether or not he's on the side of the angels or the devils. It's a very strong start.

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